1,100 words before preschool

Newsletter

Newsletter

Sign Up for Email Updates

Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly dose of inspiration. Enjoy inspirational quotes, uncommon vocabulary words, facts about the word gap and Word Rebel program updates. Read on and click the links below to see what you’ve missed in recent newsletters.

Recent Newsletters

August 17, 2017: Why did I leave teaching to found Word Rebel? While teaching 6th – 12th grade students with disabilities  in NYC , I noticed that 9 of 10 students did not have an actual reading  disability;  they had a reading deficit. They read 4 – 6 years below grade level solely because of their limited vocabularies. When I attempted to research and create an effective vocabulary intervention, I found that no school-age (K – 12) intervention had ever successfully closed the vocabulary gap. I started Word Rebel to give parents the tools they need to read and teach vocabulary from birth – despite limited time, money and other socioeconomic barriers.

August 10, 2017: We are partnered with the three YWCA daycares in New York City, including Roberta Bright Early Learning Center. They serve 60 children living in Surfside Gardens and other Coney Island housing developments. Since 2015, our literacy programs have supported their mission to eliminate racism, empower women, stand up for social justice and strengthen communities.

August 3, 2017: Our largest childcare partner, University Settlement Children’s Corner, just received their shipment of 180 books for every child they serve. After flooding destroyed almost all of their books, we are grateful for the opportunity to rebuild their active lending library with the following titles and more: Fox in Sox, Go, Dog, Go!, Dr. Seuss’ ABC’s, Goodnight Moon, Clifford Bilingual Series, Classic Fairytales Bilingual Series, and more!

July 27, 2017: Word Rebel has been Bellevue Day Care Center’s sole book provider for the past three years.  Today, all  41 children – ages 6 months to 4 years old – will receive two books each to build home libraries. 20 of these children are raised in Spanish-speaking homes and will receive bilingual versions of classic titles: The Cat in the Hat, A Very Hungry Caterpillar, Curious George, and Brown Bear, Brown Bear…

July 20, 2017: Global Giving, our corporate donor platform, interviewed and featured us as their monthly Success Story. Read the article, 5 Simple Questions that Skyrocketed One Nonprofit’s Reach, to learn more about our  commitment to providing the best possible programming for our families and children.

July 12, 2017: Want to give 15 kids a bestselling book and an entire year of weekly tips – proven to improve preschool vocabulary? As a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit, 100% of every tax-deductible donation directly funds books for at-risk kids! Donate today.

July 6, 2017: After hours of desperate meetings, newly appointed Family Worker, Mary Wins, conceded that she had zero budget for books for the 175 children at her Children’ Corner daycare center.. Until she reached out to her predecessor – who told her to call Word Rebel! We are so grateful for the opportunity to launch our 3rd year as the sole book provider for Children’s Corner, and all of our partnering daycares in NYC. Thanks to supporters like you, 2,000+ children will enjoy our top-rated book collection (pictured above). Do you want to make a 4th year of book shipments possible? As a volunteer-run nonprofit, 100% of every tax-deductible donation to Word Rebel is used to donate books to children in need.

June 29, 2017: Do you know any teachers, students or summer camp counselors? Why not give kids a free and easy way to get involved in community service, social justice and entrepreneurship? Share our printable Fundraiser Materials that students and teachers can use to effortlessly host one of Word Rebel’s kid-friendly fundraisers: Bake Sale for Books; Lemonade Stand for Literacy; Dress Down Day for Daycares; Pizza Party for a Purpose…

June 22, 2017: We are so appreciative of Columbia Greenhouse Nursery School for reaching out to donate 75 books to one of our NYCHA daycare partners in Harlem. Thanks to you, 75 children, born into low-income housing projects, will build their very first home libraries.

June 8, 2017: Check out our new 2x weekly parent email containing 3 eBook and quick tips to teach vocabulary on the go.

May 25, 2017: We’ve overhauled and updated our website. Check it out and spread the news. Do you know any educators, event planners or philanthropists? Share our updated website with friends and family interested in donating, hosting a party with a purpose, or organizing a school fundraiser. We appreciate your support.

May 18, 2017: We now offer a downloadable fundraiser bundle so you can host an effortless party with a purpose!  Choose from 10 events, each with materials for $3 or $30 entry fees. Throw a summertime happy hour, BBQ, tailgate or open bar event. Organize a book club, booksgiving or benefit dinner. Download sample invitations, thank you letters and images to promote your event via email and social media. Print flyers to promote your event via snail mail and around your campus or office. Why wait?

May 11, 2017: Interested in giving a gift that gives back this Mother’s Day? Need a last minute inexpensive gift you can feel good about? Make a donation in honor of your mom or grandma and print the charitable gift card to include in your Mother’s Day card this Sunday. Take time to remember your favorite childhood reading moments. Then help the next generation of at-risk youth form their own storytime memories. With every $15 donation providing 5 books to mothers and children in need, Word Rebel offers the perfect feel good gift that gives back!

May 4, 2017: Did you know that every tax-exempt nonprofit is required to publicly disclose their tax returns, which includes revenue and expenses, including the amount of money spent on salaries and overhead versus direct programming? We encourage you to search and review every nonprofit’s form 990 before you decide to donate. That is why we share our form 990 tax returns directly on our donation page. Word Rebel is proud to be one of the few nonprofits that uses 100% of every donation to directly benefit the children we serve.

April 20, 2017: We are excited to become a New York campaign partner in the Read Aloud 15 Minutes National Campaign. Thanks to the organization, Read Aloud 15 Minutes, we can now share free Spanish and English resources with our childcare partners and parents. These excellent posters and distributable flyers remind parents of the importance of daily reading aloud starting at birth, and provide strategies to read aloud on the go.

April 13, 2017: This week in Texas,  Ms. Pettijohn  and 4th period students raised money to donate books to children in New York City. Thank you Walnut Grove Middle School students for being true global citizens.  We cannot wait to tell our partnering childcare providers and families where their books came from! Want to host your own fundraiser, throw a party with a purpose, or organize a school or local event? In exchange for $3+ donations, offer donuts…or cocktails at a “beers for books” happy hour, potluck or brunch party. Start planning TODAY!

April 6, 2017: What is happening this week in Midlothian, Texas? Walnut Grove Middle School students are completing a service learning unit by throwing a fundraiser for Word Rebel! Thank you Ms. Pettijohn for proving that kids don’t have to wait to grow up to change the world. Thank you Walnut Grove Middle School students for giving children born into poverty the books and literacy skills vital to succeeding in preschool and beyond. All children deserve an equal opportunity to achieve their dreams; Your support makes this equality a reality.  Want to host your own fundraiser, throw a party with a purpose or organize a school or community event? Start planning TODAY!

March 30, 2017: Women’s History Month Edition #3: In Boston in 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Marathon. She wasn’t trying to make a statement. She simply wanted to run. Her attitude changed when, during the marathon, the race manager ran onto the track to stop her, and a media truck shouted at her for miles, asking what she was trying to prove.  She decided  she had a duty to finish – to debunk the antiquated myth that running ruined female reproductive organs, and to prove that women could run as well as men. She realized mid-race: “Pain was nothing. It was part of what made you a hero, doing this, overcoming it, relegating pain to the incidental for a higher purpose…The reason there are no intercollegiate sports for women at big universities, no scholarships, prize money, or races longer than 800 meters is because women don’t have the opportunities to prove they want those things. If they could just take part, they’d feel the power and accomplishment and the situation would change.” Words have power. Read up.

March 23, 2017: Women’s History Month Edition #2: Words fight inequality – and not only for the children we serve. While text books seem to feature white land owning men, take time during women’s history month to read how women have changed history. In 1905, Nettie Stevens discovered that men produced X and Y chromosomes, while women produced only X chromosomes. She was the first to determine that chromosomes from both parents determined gender (contrary to former beliefs that body temperature, nutrition or chromosomes from just one parent determined gender). Her colleague and mentor, Edmund Wilson, independently “discovered” chromosomes later in the same year as Nettie. He received sole credit even though he “discovered” chromosomes after Nettie and he still falsely believed that environmental factors impacted gender. Nettie Steven’s theory that chromosomes  alone determined gender could not be proven at the time, and was largely disregarded.

March 16, 2017: Women’s History Month Edition #1: Rosalind Franklin was one of many female scientists robbed of credit for a major discovery. She took the first x-ray image of DNA that revealed its double helix structure. Meanwhile, James Watson and Francis Crick were also trying to determine the structure of DNA. They spoke to Maurice Wilkins, who happened to be working on a separate project in Rosalind’s lab. Without Rosalind’s permission or knowledge, Wilkins showed the men her image of DNA. Using Rosalind’s photo, Watson, Crick, and Wilkins “discovered” the correct structure of DNA, which they published in the journal, Nature, in 1953. Franklin published an article in the same issue, providing more detailed observations about DNA’s structure. However, all three men refused to acknowledge that Rosalind made the original image and discovery. Only the men received a Nobel Prize for their discovery of the double helix.

March 9, 2017: Thanks to the generous collaboration of First Book, and the support of JetBlue Airways, our 45 childcare partners have all been offered $100 worth of free culturally-relevant books. Thank you First Book! “Meditate. Live purely. Be quiet. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine.” Siddhārtha Gautama – For weekly inspirational quotes, uncommon vocabulary words, and updates on the achievement gap and readiness gap, sign up for our newsletter today!

March 2, 2017: Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss! Words don’t only matter for the children we serve. Read up! Theodore Seuss Giesel was born on March 2, 1904. When he was a college student at Dartmouth, he got caught drinking in the dorms during Prohibition. He was kicked off the school’s humor magazine, but continued contributing under the pseudonym, Seuss. Seuss used this pen name as a cartoonist for various magazines and advertising departments. His advertisements for the insecticide, FLIT (containing DDT), became nationally famous, which led to an offer to illustrate children’s books. This inspired his own book, And to Think that I Saw it on Mulberry Street. It was rejected 27 times before it was published in 1937. He didn’t become the icon he is today until 1954. After LIFE magazine wrote an article about children’s increasingly low reading levels (the rise of the word gap?), Seuss wrote a book with all 220 Dolch site words (the most commonly used words for early readers). The book? The Cat in the Hat. Over his lifetime, Seuss wrote over 60 books.

February 23, 2017: Black History Month Edition #4 – Mary Lou Williams was the first woman to “make it” as a jazz musician and the first woman to start a record label. Born in 1910, she was a piano prodigy. By 7, she was playing professionally to help support her 10 siblings. By 15, she was performing with Duke Ellington and other legendary jazz musicians. She wrote 350 compositions and recorded 100+ records, all of which influenced Kansas City swing, big-band jazz, and bebop. Williams paved the way for women to succeed in the music industry. Near the end of her life, she said, “I did it, didn’t I? Through muck and mud.” What other trail blazers have been left out of history books? Words have power. Read up.

February 16, 2017: Black History Month Edition #3 – A story most children never learn in school is that of Saartje Baartman. In 1810, Saartje was 21. While she came from a South African culture that did not keep written records, she was forced to “sign” a contract agreeing to be exhibited to English and French onlookers. While slavery was already illegal in England, Saartje’s “employers” avoided arrest by producing their “contract.” For five years, she was exhibited in a cage alongside zoo animals. Her body was studied as a scientific specimen to “prove” that blacks and whites were separate, unequal races. When she died at 26, her body was dissected and displayed in jars, alongside her skeleton and a cast of her body, in France’s Museum of Man. The display remained until 1974. What other stories of racism and human atrocity have been left untold to preserve the reputation of “civilized” Western society? Words have power. Read up.

February 9, 2017: Black History Month Edition #2 – In elementary schools, Rosa Parks is illustrated as a meek seamstress who simply became too tired to give up her seat to a white passenger. Yet, the image of Rosa Parks as an accidental catalyst for the Montgomery Bus Boycott is a false one – one that devalues her perseverance and ingenuity. Why is this important? Hundreds of similar bus “incidents” and activists were completely ignored by the media. This is why Parks devoted years to communist activist groups, the NAACP and the Voter’s League. She strategically chose to board a bus driven by a known racist with prior altercations with black passengers. She and MLK Jr. trained for months to plan and execute an “incident” that could not be ignored – an “incident” powerful enough to convince an entire city of African Americans to give up public transportation for 381 days before the federal court finally ruled segregated buses unconstitutional. What other African-American achievements and injustices have been watered down in schools? Words have power. Read up.

February 2, 2017: Black History Month Edition #1 – If “black history” was woven into “regular history” throughout the school year, perhaps more students would learn about important historical figures who happen to be labelled as “black” in America. One such figure is the very first African-American novelist – who also happens to be a woman. Why is Harriet Beecher Stowe a household name while Harriet Wilson is forgotten? Just as pilgrims and explorers are glorified in elementary schools, so are abolitionists. While white abolitionists were against slavery in the south, they were not for racial equality in the north. When Harriet Wilson published her novel in 1859, nonfiction slave narratives and white-authored novels, like Uncle Tom’s Cabin, were extremely popular. Northerners were happy to read about the evils of southern slavery. They were less than happy to acknowledge the artistic talent of a black author who exposed northern hypocrisy. Wilson’s semi-autobiographical novel told the story of a “free” northern house keeper who endured similar conditions and treatment as a “house slave” in the south. Since Wilson illustrated northern racism, her historical achievement received zero recognition until being “rediscovered” in 1982. What other African-American achievements and injustices have gone forgotten in schools? Words have power. Read up.

January 26, 2017: We are so thankful to The Shaughnessy Family Foundation for their generous grant to provide books and ongoing literacy instruction to 340 children living in four of the highest poverty communities in New York City. In East Harlem, we are partnered with four childcare centers serving the Carver, Metro North, Washington and White housing projects (NYCHA). Because of The Shaughnessy Family Foundation, all 340 children under four who live in these housing projects will take home their very own book. Thank you!

January 19, 2017: Words don’t only matter for the children we serve, read up to learn five facts you did not know about Martin Luther King Jr. (1) King was originally named Michael until his father traveled to Germany and became inspired by the Christian leader, Martin Luther, changing his own name as well as his 5-year-old son’s. (2) After skipping 9th and 12th grade, King attended Morehouse College at the early age of 15. (3) King was jailed 29 times for nonviolent protest and once for driving 30 mph in a 25 mph zone. (4) In the wake of the iconic images of fire hoses and dogs being used on nonviolent protesters in 1963, King was personally criticized by black and white clergy alike for taking risks and endangering the children who attended the demonstration. (5) The night before his assassination, after enduring incessant death threats and the discouragingly slow progress of civil rights, King gave a labor rights speech to black garbage workers: “Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now…I may not get there with you, but we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land. And I’m happy tonight. I’m not worried about anything. I’m not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.”

January 12, 2017: Word Rebel was honored to be included in Allison Butler’s Women’s Empowerment Retreat gift bag on January 6th.  Allison Butler, a life couch, professional speaker and best selling author, transformed her own experience with poverty and incarceration into a career as the “Prison Break” life coach. While Word Rebel works to prevent the cycle of education inequality, school dropouts, incarceration and unemployment, Allison works on the opposite end of the spectrum, helping women who were not raised with equal access to opportunity to now experience freedom in every sense of the word. We share Allison’s driving philosophy that “All women deserve to live their ‘impossible’ dream.” We are excited that the women attending the retreat could be part of preventing the cycle of poverty for the next generation.

January 5, 2017: Happy New Year! 1,700 parents are enrolled in our weekly literacy email to receive 3 eBooks and 3 tips to teach early childhood literacy skills. Want to stay up-to-date on how we are using words to close the achievement gap? Want to stay inspired to make your own change? Subscribe for our weekly newsletter to receive weekly inspirational quotes, uncommon vocabulary words, and readiness gap updates!

December 29, 2016: Of our fifteen day care partners in Brooklyn, three are in Coney Island. Two of our Police Athletic League day cares and one of our YWCA day cares serve 170 children living in subsidized housing. We are grateful for the opportunity to work with the dedicated educators at these sites to build home libraries in Coney Island.

December 22, 2016: Word Rebel is honored to be included in the 2017 She Rocks Awards gift bag, which will be given to all 650 event guests! As part of their gift bag, every She Rocks Awards attendee will receive one charitable gift card explaining that a book was donated in their honor. We are excited to be part if this event, which honors the achievements of women in the music industry.

December 15, 2016: We are excited to partner with Ready4K and Parent Powered to expand our literacy text messaging service! By incorporating Ready4K into our current programming, our parents will begin receiving not one but three literacy text messages every single week. Originally launched through Stanford University, Ready4K’s bite-size tips-by-text have been proven to increase parent engagement in literacy practices, and to significantly improve children’s expressive and receptive vocabulary, phonological awareness and print knowledge. We are thankful for the opportunity to support Ready4K’s mission to use the powerful simplicity of text messaging to improve the lives of parents and children around the world.

December 8, 2016: Want to feel good about online shopping?Choose Word Rebel as your Amazon Smile charity. When you shop at smile.amazon.com, you’ll find the exact same prices, selection and shopping experience as amazon.com, with the added bonus that .5% of your purchase will be used to donate books to children in need. If you already have an Amazon account, your same account, shopping cart, wish list, and other account settings will appear on Amazon Smile. Happy shopping!

December 1, 2016: November was a month full of gratitude. Thanks to the support we received on #GivingTuesday, we raised funds to donate 200 books to children in need. Thank you! We are also honored to have received the James Patterson Grant earlier this month. Thanks to best selling author, James Patterson, and Scholastic Reading Club, Word Rebel has received a grant to donate 1,000 books to build 20 day care libraries in low-income housing projects throughout New York. James Patterson personally read and selected the winning recipients amongst thousands of grant applicants. We are thankful to be chosen to give more children access to high-quality books and an equal opportunity to succeed.

November 25, 2016: Happy Thanksgiving. Since our first full year of programming in 2015, we have donated 5,500 books to children living in the highest poverty neighborhoods in New York City. We are so thankful for your support, and for the opportunity to share your generosity with the children we serve. We thank you on behalf of 30 children living in temporary family shelters, 800 children living throughout 15 public housing projects, and thousands of other children living below the poverty line in Brooklyn, Manhattan and the Bronx. Because of you, these children have received classic children’s books to build home libraries in 2015 and in 2016. Their parents continue to receive weekly questioning strategies to easily teach vocabulary and reading skills despite limited time and resources. Thank you for giving thousands of children the opportunity to reach their full potential. We appreciate everything you have done to support our cause.

November 17, 2016: The mission of our East Harlem partner, Boys & Girls Harbor, is to empower children to see a future for themselves they never imagined by exposing them to experiences that help them discover their full potential. Over 70 parents of children at the Boys & Girls Harbor Day Care have received award-winning books to build their home libraries. Now, they receive weekly eBooks and strategies to build their child’s vocabulary and reading skills.We are grateful to support Boys & Girls Harbor’s mission  by ensuring children start preschool with the literacy skills they need to succeed.

November 10, 2016: In addition to donating books, we bridge the gap between all literacy resources and the families who needs them the most. This is why we subscribe parents to a weekly literacy email and  text message. Every week, parents receive 3 eBooks and 3 specific strategies that make it easy to teach reading skills during daily routines. When all parents have access to high quality books and literacy strategies, all children will have an equal opportunity to succeed. Our partnering day care directors shared that learning how to teach their child academic skills in a few minutes walking down the street or sitting on the subway has been “huge” for parents with multiple jobs and little to no free time. Parents are motivated to commit to one small action a day that makes a big difference. They report feeling thankful that they can give their children the same opportunities as parents who can afford shelves of expensive books.

October 27, 2016: Did you know Halloween began as the Celtic New Year’s Eve 2,000 years ago? The festival of Samhain (Sow-in) celebrated the end of the summer harvest and the beginning of winter. Since winter was associated with darkness, death and much apprehension, ancient Celts did “tricks” to tell the future. Since the day of Samhain marked a transition from life to death, Celts believed the dead roamed the earth. They wore masks to disguise themselves from evil spirits and left candles and “treats” on their doorstep for deceased family members.  1,000 years later the Pope strategically discouraged “pagan” traditions when he changed All Martyr’s Day to All Saint’s Day and moved it from May to October. This Halloween and every holiday, Don’t blindly follow tradition. Read up.

October 20, 2016: The Sumner Houses contain 1,100 apartment units for low-income families in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn. We are partnered with both of the child care centers serving the 125 children under 4 who live there. Thanks to supporters like you, all 125 children have received the award-winning books pictured above. Last week, our dedicated partner set up and distributed the above display of Word Rebel books at a Family Literacy Workshop. In addition to building home libraries, she educated families about the importance of reading from birth, and subscribed them to receive Word Rebel’s weekly tips to teach vocabulary.

October 13, 2016: This Columbus Day and every day, don’t blindly follow tradition or the words teachers have told you. While most text books taught us Columbus discovered America, he landed in Cuba, Haiti and the Dominican Republic in 1492 and Venezuela in 1493. On both journeys, he was convinced he had landed in Asia. He disagreed with experts at the time, believing the journey from Spain to Japan was 2,300 miles instead of closer to 16,000. After illegally establishing slavery in the Caribbean, he was stripped of all titles and claims to the “Indies”. In 1506, he died still convinced he had discovered a shorter route to Asia. While Columbus never discovered North America, he did set in motion the Columbian Exchange, the global trade of people, plants, animals, diseases, and cultures that continues to affect nearly every society on the planet. Maybe this Columbus Day should celebrate the sharing of diverse cultures, and the power of words to change history.

October 6, 2016: Word Rebel is partnered with six of twelve Sheltering Arms Early Childhood Centers serving 1,300 children throughout New York City. Our Lower East Side partner serves 45 children in the Jacob Riis Housing Projects on 10th St & Ave D. Today, all 45 children will receive a hardcover book (assortment shown right). Every week, parents will also receive strategies that make it easy to teach reading skills while walking along city sidewalks, riding the bus, eating dinner, etc.

September 29, 2016: Our partner, The Children’s Aid Society, serves children living in the Drew Hamilton Housing Projects on 143rd Street in Harlem. In addition to providing year round care for 80 children, they offer family support and workshops. All 80 families have now received hardcover books to build home libraries. Starting today, they receive weekly downloadable books and strategies to teach reading skills during daily routines.

September 22, 2016: Our South Bronx partner, H.E.L.P., is a transitional housing shelter dedicated to ending family homelessness. In addition to providing a safe place for 96 homeless children to live, HELP runs child care programs to lessen the trauma of poverty and homelessness. We are grateful for the opportunity to contribute to their family involvement and support component by providing books and literacy resources to the 30 children they serve under 5 years old.

September 15, 2016: Our partner, Virginia Day Early Childhood Education Center, serves 67 families in the Lower East Side housing projects. The center empowers families with an average annual income of $16,000 to pursue their own professional goals without sacrificing their children’s education. Last night, they held their first of several orientations to distribute Word Rebel books and resources. As of today, 20 families have the tools to make story-time and literacy instruction part of their daily routine.

September 8, 2016: Last week, we visited 40 of our childcare partners serving high poverty neighborhoods throughout Brooklyn, Manhattan and the Bronx to distribute literacy resources and take book orders. Books have shipped! 30 daycare directors are currently distributing their chosen assortment of classic children’s books to every child they serve. At our 10 Bronx daycares, every family is now enrolling to receive 1 new book every month from like-minded nonprofit, Imagination Library. Finally, every family receives their new book with a free subscription to Word Rebel’s weekly email-text service, which makes daily literacy instruction effortless for hardworking families living below the poverty line.

September 1, 2016: Our mission is not only to provide families with Word Rebel books and resources. We also provide resources that make it effortless for families to take advantage of every free book available. This week, 3,500 families are learning which local “Reach Out and Read” pediatricians provide books and literacy training at yearly check-ups.  At our Bronx daycares, 630 families are currently enrolling in “Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library.” Every single month, 630 families will be mailed one high quality, age-appropriate book directly to their homes.

August 25, 2016: Thanks to First Book and Molina Healthcare, our 45 childcare partners will receive 30 wellness-themed children’s books!

August 18, 2016: We are excited to subscribe thousands of parents to our weekly literacy text and email service. The hardworking parents we serve have almost no extra time to read to their children. It is often difficult, if not impossible, for parents living in poverty to give their children the resources and experiences they need to have an equal opportunity to succeed. This is why Word Rebel’s mission is not simply to donate books. We empower parents to use every available moment to teach vocabulary and reading skills. Every parent wants the best for their child. Not every parent realizes that the best way a parent can prepare a child for college is to teach them 1,100 word before preschool. We are here to bridge the gap.

August 11, 2016: We are so thankful to have received a grant from the Laura B. Vogler Foundation. Thanks to this NYC-based Foundation and the huge generosity of our individual donors, we are ready to ship 2,100 books to 30 of our day cares. We are so excited to make one free book and one year of weekly literacy instruction part of how our childcare partners greet children on their very first day!

August 4, 2016: Shout out to our powerhouse supporter, Ms. Noriega, for throwing her kids a tea party with a purpose this weekend! We are so inspired by the speedy ambition with which she organized this event, and by her creativity. Thank you for inspiring children to make positive change for other children in need. Are you inspired to create your own adorable party favors? Invite your friends to party with a purpose and their $3 “entry fee” will change the life of a child forever. We can’t wait to see how you choose to party with a purpose! Read more.

July 27, 2016: Planning to host a book club, pool party, potluck or cocktail party this summer? You can party with a purpose when every guests’ $3 “entry fee” provides one book and one year of early childhood literacy instruction to a preschooler living in poverty in NYC. For weekly inspirational quotes, uncommon vocabulary words, and updates on the achievement gap and readiness gap, read more.


For older posts from our weekly newsletter, click here.